Collie Dog Breed Information Center – A Guide To The Rough Collie

The Rough Collie

Rough collies are a medium sized dog breed with short legs and thick fur. They have small heads, sharp teeth, strong jaws and powerful bodies. Their coats vary from white to black or brownish red. The coat color varies depending on the littermates’ coloring, but they all look like this:

These dogs are known for their endurance, loyalty and love of the outdoors. These dogs are very intelligent and playful. They make excellent family pets. They do not bark much, but when they do, it means that something really good is going to happen soon!

The Rough Collie History

In 1871, William “Billy” Russell discovered the first wild collie in Scotland. Since then, there were only two other purebred collies left alive: one was found dead in England in 1885 and another died at the San Francisco Zoo in 1899.

After these two collies died, the rest of the collie population dwindled down until only three dogs remained: two males and a female. The male named “Jack Russell” lived in Scotland while the female called “Dolly” lived in America. Dolly was a bit older than Jack and she had been bred to produce offspring with other collies. She did not want any children so she gave birth to her own litter of five puppies.

Then, Dolly made sure that all of her puppies were to drown themselves in a nearby pond. One by one, her pups drowned until only one was left. This dog was to become the ancestor of the Rough Collie.

In the late 1800s, Scottish shepherds discovered the dog and began to call it the “Colley.” In 1890, James Clark won a Colley contest in Scotland and made the dog famous shortly before Dolly died. The dog’s offspring, “Nell” was sent to James Clark’s brother William in Yorkshire. In James’ honor, this dog became known as a “Rough Collie.”

After the discovery of the Rough Collie in 1890, breeders began to create a new line of Rough Collie dogs by mating them with border collies. Since then, these dogs have been bred especially for their appearance. They are now known as the Rough Collie and their popularity continues to grow.

The Rough collie is an intelligent dog breed that is very easy to train. They enjoy being around people and are very playful. These dogs are also very good with children. Many shepherds, especially in Scotland, still use Rough Collies as working dogs on their farms.

Some well-known celebrities own this breed of dog too, including actress Julia Roberts and musician Phil Collins.

Collie Dog Breed Information Center – A Guide To The Rough Collie - Dog Puppy Site

The Rough Collie’s fur can be either thick or thin. Even though it may seem thick, the dog requires regular grooming. Their fur also tends to shed, especially when they are going into “coat-molt.” This usually happens once a year, but some dogs shed more than others.

These dogs can come in any color or combination of colors. They can have either curled or straight tails, but most have curly tails. They tend to be medium-sized dogs with long legs. Male Rough Collies are about 22 to 24 inches in height and weigh anywhere from 45 to 70 pounds. Females are usually slightly smaller than the males and weigh anywhere from 35 to 60 pounds. The life span of these Rough Collies is usually 10 to 15 years.

Temperament

The Rough Collie is an intelligent, playful, loving and obedient dog breed that was bred to work all day. These dogs love being around people and thrive on human companionship. They tend to be shy around strangers when they are first introduced, but never aggressive. In general, this breed is very loving toward children and is good with other pets.

Sometimes the Rough Collie likes to follow its owner around the house. Most Roughies are also great watchdogs since they have a lot of energy and like to bark when someone is at the door.

The Rough Collie is a great family dog. These dogs need to be around people and do not do well if they are left alone for long periods of time. They also need human interaction in order to remain obedient. Since this breed is so intelligent, it can become destructive if it does not have enough things to occupy its mind.

Roughies get along well with children and other pets when they are raised with them.

Sources & references used in this article:

Genetic analysis of a temperament test as a tool to select against everyday life fearfulness in Rough Collie by P Arvelius, HE Asp, WF Fikse… – Journal of animal …, 2014 – academic.oup.com

Bred for perfection: Shorthorn cattle, collies, and Arabian horses since 1800 by ME Derry – 2003 – books.google.com

Controlling canine hip dysplasia in Finland by M LeppaÈnen, H Saloniemi – Preventive veterinary medicine, 1999 – Elsevier

Border Collie Studies by JH McCulloch – 1952 – books.google.com

Veterinary medical guide to dog and cat breeds by J Bell, K Cavanagh, L Tilley, FWK Smith – 2012 – books.google.com

Optic Nerve Colobomas by C Center, P Care, SP Insurance – embracepetinsurance.com

Pancreatic acinar atrophy in German shepherd dogs and rough-coated Collies by ME Wiberg – Etiopathogenesis and response to long-term enzyme …, 2003 – core.ac.uk

Pancreatic acinar atrophy in German shepherd dogs and rough-coated Collies: Etiopathogenesis and response to long-term enzyme replacement treatment by M Wiberg – 2003 – helda.helsinki.fi