Diabetic Dog Food – What’s the Best Choice for Your Pet

Diabetic Dog Food – What’s the Best Choice for My Pet?

What Can I Feed My Diabetes-Dependent Dog?

The following are some things you can feed your diabetic dog:

Low Glycemic Diet (LGD) – This type of diet contains less carbohydrates than other types of diets. These foods contain less sugar and fat than regular dry kibble. They are suitable for dogs with diabetes.

High Protein Diet (HPD) – High protein diets have higher amounts of proteins than other types of diets. These foods contain high quality meat, poultry, fish and eggs. These foods are suitable for dogs with diabetes.

Protein Blend Diet (PBD) – A blend of different meats and bones together to make one meal that is suitable for dogs with diabetes. This type of diet contains more chicken than any other kind of food. Chicken is a good source of protein.

A combination of these three types of diets are suitable for dogs with diabetes. Dogs may not need all three types of diets. Some dogs do better on just one type or none at all.

You will want to experiment with feeding your dog the right diet for him/her based on their individual needs and preferences. There are many choices available when it comes to diabetic dog food recipes!

What Human Foods Can I Feed My Dog?

Here’s a list of human foods you can feed your dog :

Cheese (limited amounts)

Eggs (scrambled or boiled – no yolks)

Fish (no fish with “fishy” oils like mackerel or salmon)

Hamburger (85% lean beef)

Low-sodium broth (beef, chicken, or vegetable)

Non-citrus fruits (peeled)

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Peanut Butter (smooth only)

Pork (no ribs, no ham, no bacon)

Small amounts of lean meat, skinless chicken, fish, or turkey

Vegetables (cooked or canned without salt)

These are only a few of the more common human foods that are safe for your dog to eat. It is best to keep a log of what you feed your dog, including amounts, so that you can determine whether they are having an allergic reaction to something or if there is some other issue.

As with anything, it is important to remember not to overfeed your dog and remember that these foods should only make up 10% of their daily diet.

Unsafe Foods For Dogs

Most dog owners have probably said this one to their dogs at one time or another, but it’s very true: dogs really should not eat people food. Most of the time, when people think about feeding their dogs people food, they think about treats. While a dog might enjoy a few snacks every now and then, most human foods are not nutritious for a dog and can cause major health issues.

Sugary Foods

Sugar is bad for dogs for a couple of reasons. In large amounts, sugar can cause weight gain and obesity. Even more alarming is that sugar can be very harmful to a dog’s liver.

In smaller amounts, sugar is still not good for a dog and may cause hyperactivity or other behavioral issues.

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Sugar can be found in fruits, breads, and other grains.

Chocolate

While it’s very true that not all dogs are affected by chocolate in the same way, it’s best to just avoid it altogether. The Theobromine in chocolate can cause issues with a dog’s heart and central nervous system, even in small amounts. Some dogs can have worse reactions to chocolate than others, so it’s best to just stay away from it.

Onions, Garlic, and Other Alliums

The chemical in these vegetables can destroy a dog’s red blood cells and cause permanent anemia. Even a small amount of garlic or onion, even in cooked foods, can be dangerous for your dog.

Caffeine

Teas, coffees, sodas, and other caffeinated beverages are not good for dogs. These drinks contain high levels of caffeine that are toxic to dogs.

Alcohol

It’s probably obvious that alcohol should not be given to dogs. Even small amounts of alcohol can cause issues with a dog’s liver and brain. In addition, when alcohol is broken down by the body, it becomes sugar, which we know can be harmful to a dog.

What Precautions Should Be Taken?

Dogs are prone to overeating. If you give them something like table scraps they will generally always want more. This can lead to obesity, which is one of the biggest killers of dogs. Obesity can cause a whole host of other issues including diabetes, heart disease, and joint problems.

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If your dog is overweight, make an effort to limit their intake of high fat foods like people food. Instead, feed them healthy dog food and give them access to lots of water. You should also take it easy on the treats and give them only as a reward for good behavior or achievements.

If your dog has a serious medical condition like diabetes or epilepsy, it is especially important to consult your veterinarian before introducing new foods into their diet.

What To Remember Most About This Article:: While people food can be very good for your dogs in small amounts, it’s important to remember that they are not humans and their bodies can’t handle certain things that we can. Before feeding your dog people food, remember to consult your veterinarian first to find out which foods are safe and which aren’t.

Sources & references used in this article:

Evaluation of a quality‐of‐life tool for dogs with diabetes mellitus by SJM Niessen, S Powney, J Guitian… – Journal of Veterinary …, 2012 – Wiley Online Library

AAHA diabetes management guidelines for dogs and cats by R Rucinsky, A Cook, S Haley… – Journal of the …, 2010 – Am Animal Hosp Assoc

Feline Diabetes Mellitus by FD Mellitus, C Reusch – pflah.com

Evaluation of a quality‐of‐life tool for cats with diabetes mellitus by SJM Niessen, S Powney, J Guitian… – Journal of veterinary …, 2010 – Wiley Online Library

Essays on History by …, AWIH Trafficking, TRS Mockingbird, WE Diabetes… – Sexuality and Identity … – vs.edu.mk

Home monitoring of the diabetic pet by LJ Ackerman – 1999 – Alpine Publications Incorporated

2018 AAHA diabetes management guidelines for dogs and cats by MA Mathes – Clinical techniques in small animal practice, 2002 – Elsevier