Different Types Of Dogs: The Dog Breed Groups Explained

Different Types Of Dogs: The Dog Breed Groups Explained

The different types of dogs are divided into two main categories: Working Group Dogs and Sporting Group Dogs.

Working Group Dogs (WG)

These dogs have been bred for their physical strength, endurance, agility and other qualities which make them useful in work situations. They are usually large breed with a long body and short legs, but they can be any size or shape. Their coat tends to be thick and coarsely bristled, making it difficult for them to shed. They tend to have strong muscles, but they do not need a lot of exercise. WG’s are often used in agricultural work such as ploughing, harvesting and other manual labor tasks.

Sporting Group Dogs (SGD)

These dogs have been bred for their athletic abilities, speed and jumping ability. These dogs are generally small breed with short legs and long bodies. They tend to have a lighter coat than WG’s and are less likely to shed. SGD’s are commonly found in hunting, sports and show events.

Athletic Group Dogs (AGD)

These dogs were bred for their athleticism rather than physical attributes. AGDs have short legs, long bodies and thin coats. They tend to be medium sized breed with heavy coats. AGDs excel at jumping over fences, through obstacles, running fast and performing tricks.

Non-Sporting Group Dogs (NSGD)

These dogs were not bred for their abilities or athletic prowess. They tend to be of medium size with short coats. They are often kept as companion animals and rarely participate in shows or sports events. Can be kept as working dogs on farms and ranches, but are primarily kept as pets.

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Herding Group Dogs (HGD)

These dogs have been bred to work in a group as well-organized teams that control and direct livestock. They tend to have long legs, long necks, sharp eyesight and a loud bark. These dogs are most comfortable working outdoors and on large areas of land. They do best with people who are experienced at training dogs and are looking for a pet they can train for competitive sports or herding competitions.

Hairless Group Dogs (HGD)

These dogs have very little hair and are bred for medical research. They tend to have very few hairs and the skin can be susceptible to sunburn and other elements. These dogs do not do well in extreme weather conditions and need extra care when exposed to the elements. The Hairless Group Dogs are best suited to a climate-controlled environment or a human who is dedicated to providing them with the medical attention they need.

Sources & references used in this article:

Trainability and boldness traits differ between dog breed clusters based on conventional breed categories and genetic relatedness by B Turcsán, E Kubinyi, Á Miklósi – Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 2011 – Elsevier

Domestic dog skull diversity across breeds, breed groupings, and genetic clusters by D Georgevsky, JJ Carrasco, M Valenzuela… – Journal of Veterinary …, 2014 – Elsevier

Toward understanding dog evolutionary and domestication history by F Galibert, P Quignon, C Hitte, C André – Comptes rendus biologies, 2011 – Elsevier

Genomic analyses reveal the influence of geographic origin, migration, and hybridization on modern dog breed development by HG Parker, DL Dreger, M Rimbault, BW Davis… – Cell reports, 2017 – Elsevier

Dog bites in The Netherlands: a study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation by JMR Cornelissen, H Hopster – The Veterinary Journal, 2010 – Elsevier

Exploring the utility of traditional breed group classification as an explanation of problem-solving behavior of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) by T Clarke, D Mills, J Cooper – Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 2019 – Elsevier