Feeding a Dachshund Puppy – Making the Right Choices

Feeding a Dachshund Puppy – Making the Right Choices

Dachshund puppies are born with their own unique nutritional needs. They need to eat every 2 hours and they must have a balanced diet of protein, fat, carbohydrates and vitamins. A well fed dog will grow up healthy and strong. However, there are some things you should keep in mind when feeding your new puppy:

1) You cannot overfeed your puppy!

2) You must give them a variety of foods so they get used to different flavors.

3) Always start off small and gradually increase the amount given.

The following table shows what you should feed your puppy daily. Keep in mind that each individual’s body chemistry reacts differently to different nutrients and other factors, so these numbers may not apply exactly to yours or even your pup’s.

Puppy Food Amount Daily Value* Protein 1/4 cup (60 grams) 3% Fat 1 tbsp (15 grams) 6% Carbohydrates 4 oz (120 grams) 30% Vitamin B1 1 tablet (50 mg) 25% Vitamin C 2 tsp (30 ml) 10% Calcium 250 mg 100% Iron 0.5 cc (.25 fl oz / .05 fl oz ) 50% Zinc ½ tsp (.16 fl oz) 12% Iodine 1 tablet (150 mcg) 100% Copper 1/3 tbsp (5.33 mg) 33% Manganese 1/5 tbsp (1.67 mg) 33% *Percent daily value based on a 2,000 calorie diet

The table below has the measurements for each specific meal. Keeping exact measurements isn’t necessary- just try to be as close as possible.

Meal Measurement Amount Warm Water 3/4 cup 2 tablespoons Wet Food 1-2 tbsp 1/3 – 1/2 tbsp Dry Food 2 tbsp 1-2 tbsp Supplements 1/6 tablet / packet (or any combination thereof)

Feeding a Dachshund Puppy – Making the Right Choices - Picture

As a guide, here’s how much to feed your puppy every day:

Days 4 – 7: 3 times a day, 6 – 7 hours apart, 1/5 of the daily feeding amount (see table)

Days 8 – 14: 4 times a day, 5-6 hours apart, 1/4 of the daily feeding amount (see table)

Day 15 and beyond: Whatever you did the day before, but add an extra meal. So if you were feeding twice a day on Day 15, you’d feed three times a day from Day 16 onwards. The same goes for if you were feeding three times a day on Day 15, you’d also feed four times a day from Day 16 onwards.

So from Days 15 – 180: 1/2 of the daily feeding amount (see table) twice a day, 8 – 12 hours apart.

That means by Day 180 your puppy will be eating 1/4 of the daily feeding amount twice a day, 8 – 12 hours apart. This is what you’ll continue with until your Dachshund is 6 months old. From 6 – 12 months old your Dachshund puppy’s diet should follow this table:

12 Weeks – 6 Months: 1/4 of the daily feeding amount twice a day, 8 – 12 hours apart.

6 – 8 Months: 1/4 of the daily feeding amount once a day, 8 – 12 hours apart.

8 – 12 Months: 1/4 of the daily feeding amount twice a day, 8 – 12 hours apart.

Feeding a Dachshund Puppy – Making the Right Choices - DogPuppySite.com

As your Dachshund gets older the amount that they need to eat decreases. Also at 12 months old your Dachshund is an adult and no longer needs to eat puppy chow.

After 12 months old your Dachshund can eat whatever he likes as long as it’s healthy for him. Just make sure that 50% of his diet consists of meat. Also make sure to keep an eye on how much he eats because as a rule of thumb, if he’s not hungry enough to eat everything in the morning then don’t feed him again until he is.

There are some people that believe that feeding a Dachshund puppy twice a day is too much and should only be fed once a day instead. Some people also believe that you should feed your Dachshund as much as he can within a certain period of time, then remove the food, then feed him again later. These methods work just as well and it’s mostly personal preference on how you want to do it.

If you feel at any point that you’re not comfortable with how or what you’re feeding your dog, then get expert advice immediately. Also remember to have a look through our extensive guides section for any other information you might need.

Sources & references used in this article:

Dachshunds For Dummies by E Adamson – 2011 – books.google.com

Are dogs (Canis familiaris) misled more by their owners than by strangers in a food choice task? by S Marshall-Pescini, E Prato-Previde, P Valsecchi – Animal Cognition, 2011 – Springer

A reversal learning task detects cognitive deficits in a Dachshund model of late‐infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis by DN Sanders, S Kanazono, FA Wininger… – Genes, Brain and …, 2011 – Wiley Online Library

Comprehension of human communicative signs in pet dogs (Canis familiaris). by B Fogle – 1999 – Dk Pub

Conceptual perspective and lexical choice in acquisition by K Soproni, Á Miklósi, J Topál… – Journal of comparative …, 2001 – psycnet.apa.org

Shar Pei Labrador Mix Facts by EV Clark – Cognition, 1997 – Elsevier

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Dachshunds: Kibbles and Tidbits to Know Before Getting a Dachshund by LSP Mix – thedogdigest.com

Breed-specific canine food formulations by L Palika – 2002 – books.google.com