Maltese Mix Breeds – The Top Pups With One Maltese Parent

Maltese Mix Puppies For Sale

The Maltese breed originated from the island of Malta. They are a medium sized dog with long legs and thick fur. Their coat ranges from light brown to black, but they have some white hairs mixed in there too.

These dogs are very loyal, affectionate and loving pets that make great family members.

They are known for their intelligence and love of people. They tend to be quiet, but when they do speak up, it’s usually with lots of enthusiasm! The Maltese is one of the most popular breeds because they’re so easy to train and they make wonderful companions.

They are also good watchdogs and guard dogs.

In general, the Maltese is considered a “doggy” breed. That means they like to play fetch and chase things around. They enjoy being indoors, especially if they’re allowed outside to run around.

However, they will happily go out into the yard with you too!

There are many different types of Maltese mixes available today. Some are purebreds while others come from other breeds such as the pug or bulldog. Most of them are male and female mongrels (mixed breeding) though some females may exist as well.

Maltese mix breeds:

Maltese Mix Breeds – The Top Pups With One Maltese Parent - Image

Bichpoo (Maltese and shih-tzu)

Teacup Maltese(Maltese and Yorkshire Terrier)

Maltipoo (Maltese and poodle)

Maltichon (Maltese and Bichon Frise)

Malteagle (Maltese and English Bulldog)

Find out about the top 3 most popular mixed breed puppies below, which include the Malteagle, the Bichpoo and the teacup maltese

Maltese mix reviews

The Malteagle is a large breed that can grow between 3-6 feet tall and weigh up to 150 pounds. They are muscular, strong and very protective. They’re brave dogs that can be territorial at times.

The Malteagle isn’t the best choice for first time owners or those who live in an apartment. These dogs need large amounts of space and should be trained from an early age with firm, but consistent methods. They do well when involved in obedience training because it gives them something to focus on other than just their surroundings.

Maltese Mix Breeds – The Top Pups With One Maltese Parent - at DogPuppySite

The Bichpoo is a small breed that can grow to only up to 3 feet tall and weigh up to 30 pounds. They are sweet dogs that tend to have the personality of both breeds; they like people but they also like to bark loudly. They love to run around, play and get into mischief.

These dogs do well in small living areas where they can get lots of attention and love from their owners. They do not do well with children or other animals and may snap if provoked.

The teacup maltese is a small breed that can grow no taller than 10 inches and weigh up to 5 pounds. They are the smallest of all the mixed breeds, but this should not be mistaken for weakness. These dogs have the personality of both breeds and love to be around people.

They do well in small living areas where they can get lots of attention from their owners. These dogs do not do well with children or other animals and may snap if provoked.

We hope you’ve found this guide on mixed breed dogs helpful in choosing the right pet for you!

Sources & references used in this article:

Isolation and nucleotide sequence of canine glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA: identification of mutation in puppies with glycogen storage disease type Ia by PS Kishnani, Y Bao, JY Wu, AE Brix, JL Lin… – … and molecular medicine, 1997 – Elsevier

… Valley and Malta: A Narrative of Exploration and Research in Connection with the Natural History, Geology, and Archæology of the Lower Nile and Maltese … by AL Adams – 1870 – books.google.com

In-Situ conservation of the Black Maltese and performance evaluation under a small-scale intensive system by JG Mallia – INFPDE-CONFERENCE, 2013 – fao.org

First detection of tick-borne pathogens of dogs from Malta by J Cunliffe – 2011 – i5 Publishing

Outcome of medical and surgical treatment in dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy: 104 cases (1988–2004) by E Licari, N Takács, N Solymosi, R Farkas – Ticks and tick-borne diseases, 2017 – Elsevier