Why Do Dogs Yawn, And What Are Their Yawns Trying To Tell Us

Why Does My Dog Keep Yawning When I Pet His Head?

Dogs have been known to yelp out loud when they see something scary or unusual. Some dogs even bark out their alarm calls at the same time! However, most dogs don’t make any noise like this. They just look around and then go back to sleep.

But what makes your dog’s eyes bulge out so much?

The reason behind it all is called “yawn contagion.” Your dog yawns because he sees other dogs doing it too. This phenomenon happens when one person shares the same thing with another person.

So if you saw someone else yawning, would you also start yawning?

Of course not! That wouldn’t make sense!

However, when two people share the same experience, there is a chance that they will both feel sleepy at the same time. This is called the “Yawn Effect” and it’s pretty common among humans. For example, if you were to see someone else yawning, you might get sleepy too. You could end up falling asleep right there in front of them!

It’s no wonder why some people think that yawning is contagious between people. If you’re wondering how contagious yawning really is, then you’ll probably never know unless you try it yourself!

The truth is, dogs also feel sleepy at the same time when they see each other yawning. The yawning is a simple sign of sleepiness. Even if you don’t feel tired, your dog might start yawning after seeing you do it! Looking back on your history of pet ownership, you probably did this with your previous pets.

But did you ever see your dog yawn a lot when he was just sitting around?

If so, he might be sleepy and wants to take a nap.

Alternatively, your dog yawning might be a sign that something is wrong with him. Maybe he has a stuffy nose or an ear infection. If you feel like something is off about your dog’s behavior, then make an appointment with the veterinarian right away!

Why Do Dogs Yawn When You Cuddle Them?

Have you ever noticed your dog yawning a lot when you’re petting him?

It seems like he might be getting sleepy while you’re trying to show him some love!

Some people think that dogs yawn because they feel stressed out when you touch them. Or maybe they feel uncomfortable when you pet them. However, most animal experts don’t agree with this explanation. They actually have their own theory for why your dog is yawning when you’re cuddling him.

When a dog gets excited or afraid, an increase in stress hormones take over his body. Due to this response, your pet might feel the urge to yawn because his body is preparing itself for a quick getaway. You’ve seen this happen when another animal approaches your pet. He’s ready to run away from the other dog or animal at any time!

However, when a dog experiences low levels of stress, he yawns. This is because his body doesn’t prepare for anything. It’s a sign that your dog is calm and content. When you’re petting your dog, the level of stress hormones in his body lowers.

This might be why he starts yawning when you rub his belly or pet him behind the ears.

Some people believe that dogs yawn to keep themselves cool. However, the air passing through their mouths doesn’t lower their body temperature at all. All it does is increase the flow of saliva going into their mouth!

Yawning is a reflex. It’s something that happens naturally without requiring any thinking on your pet’s part. Most of the time, it’s to help keep your pet’s body functioning as usual. However, yawning can also be contagious between humans and dogs!

Your dog might see you yawn and will start to yawn too. Of course, it probably has nothing to do with being tired or having a stuffy nose!

Why Do Dogs Yawn Contagiously?

If you’ve ever seen one dog yawn, then you know what happens next… the second dog yawns too! You might be wondering why dogs yawn contagiously.

Is it due to stress or is there another explanation?

Let’s find out more about this fascinating phenomenon!

There are two different theories explaining why dogs yawn contagiously. The first one says that yawning is a way of expressing their mood. If a dog is nervous or timid, then they’re more likely to yawn. However, if they’re relaxed and content, they’re less likely to yawn.

Why Do Dogs Yawn, And What Are Their Yawns Trying To Tell Us - DogPuppySite.com

The other explanation is tied to how dogs communicate with one another. It’s believed that when dogs see each other yawn, it’s a sign of submission. If one dog yawns at another dog higher up in the pack’s “hierarchy,” then it’s showing submissiveness. On the other hand, if the lower dog yawns at a higher ranking pack member, then it means that they’re trying to reinforce their dominance.

Yawning is a way for dogs to communicate their stance in the pack!

Dogs yawn contagiously for several different reasons. It all boils down to their mood, how they’re feeling, and their place in the pack! With this new knowledge, you can better interpret when your dog yawns. If Fido starts yawning a lot, then you’ll know that he’s happy, feels relaxed around you, and is content with his place in the family!

Why Do Dogs Pant?

Have you ever seen a dog panting?

If so, then you already know how heavy and thick their tongue can get. It’s almost like they have a roll of wet leather dangling from the edge of their mouth!

Dogs pant for several reasons, with the main being that they’re trying to cool off. When a dog’s body temperature increases, then they open their mouth and start panting rapidly. All that saliva that builds up in their mouth evaporates and lowers their body temperature. This is a great way for them to cool themselves off!

Another reason why dogs pant is due to exertion.

Have you ever seen a dog pant after running around the yard for too long?

This is because they’re tired and are trying to catch their breath. While dogs don’t sweat like humans do, panting allows them to release excess body heat. However, only dogs that have heavy coats will pant. If it’s hot outside and a dog has a thin coat, then they’ll just seek shade or find a cool spot on the ground.

Dogs will also pant when they’re nervous or stressed out. If there’s a thunderstorm raging outside or a new member of the family comes home, dogs may start to pant. They’re trying to calm themselves down and are releasing that extra energy through their breath. If your dog starts panting for no reason, then you should try to stay calm as well.

Keeping yourself and your dog relaxed will help alleviate their stress.

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Why do we yawn? Primitive versus derived features by AC Gallup – Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2011 – Elsevier

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